Marriage Information

Please note: The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the entities or individuals whose names appear on the following lists. Inclusion on this list is in no way an endorsement by the Department or the U.S. government. Names are listed alphabetically, and the order in which they appear has no other significance. The information on the list is provided directly by the local service providers; the Department is not in a position to vouch for such information.

Local authorities usually require that single (unmarried, divorced or widowed) U.S. citizens marrying in Peru present a sworn statement (known locally as a Certificado de Soltería) stating that they are legally free to marry in Peru.  This document must be notarized by American Citizen Services at the Embassy.

Step 1: Click here to download a copy of the Affidavit of Single Status (Certificado de soltería)  (PDF 72 KB)

Step 2: Schedule an appointment

Step 3: Attend the appointment and pay the applicable fee

  • Fee: US$50

U.S. citizens are also usually required to provide a legalized copy of their birth certificate to local officials, which must be translated into Spanish.  Divorced U.S. citizens will need to present an official copy of their divorce decree.  Please take note that the American Citizens Services Unit can no longer certify or authenticate any vital record.  These records must be certified with an apostille by the Secretary of State of the U.S. state where the document was issued.  Please review the information regarding Notarial Services.  The American Citizen Services Unit does not provide translation services, however you can review the Ministry of Foreign Affairs website for a complete list of official translators.

Dual citizens who wish to get married using their U.S. citizenship might face additional requirements.  Please note that there are no legal differences in the United States using a marriage certificate that identifies you as a Peruvian citizen, even if you also hold a U.S. citizenship.

Marriage in Peru is performed according to the Peruvian law, and specific questions on the process should be addressed to a Peruvian attorney (PDF 129 KB) or local authorities.  Consular officials cannot perform marriage ceremonies nor can you be married at the U.S. Embassy.